Investigation of varnishes with different analytical methods

Number: 
Anno 2015
Rubriik: 
Research
TrükiPDF
ill 1. Most important triterpenoid compounds of dammar resin .(7-10)

ill 1. Most important triterpenoid compounds of dammar resin .(7-10)

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ill 2. Comparison of ATR-FT-IR spectra of beeswax, linseed oil and dammar resin.

ill 2. Comparison of ATR-FT-IR spectra of beeswax, linseed oil and dammar resin.

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ill 3. Comparison of ATR-FT-IR spectra of dammar and mastic resin.

ill 3. Comparison of ATR-FT-IR spectra of dammar and mastic resin.

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ill 4. Comparison of MALDI-FT-ICR mass spectra of dammar and shellac resin.

ill 4. Comparison of MALDI-FT-ICR mass spectra of dammar and shellac resin.

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Varnish has an important role in the composition of an art object. It adds decorative value to 
the object and helps to protect it from light, humidity, dust particles, etc., all of which 
accelerate the changes in the chemical composition of the varnish. In order to identify the
 varnish used on an art object different analytical methods can be used. However, the 
requirements for the methods are high. Varnish samples are usually a complex mixture of 
different components, small in size and amount and difficult to dissolve. IR and Raman
 spectroscopy are simple and fast methods that allow distinguishing between different 
material classes, but the identification of the various components in multi-component sample 
spectra is difficult due to overlapping of peaks in IR analysis and the interference of 
fluorescence in Raman spectroscopy. GC-MS, LC-MS and different mass spectrometers (e.g. 
FT-ICR-MS and ToF) coupled with soft ionization techniques such as MALDI, ESI, APCI 
are very efficient in identifying the chemical composition of the sample. At the same time the 
different chromatographic and mass spectrometric methods mentioned above are more labour 
intensive (requiring sample preparation) and demanding (solvent suitability must be taken 
into account etc.) compared to convenient ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Combining IR or Raman 
methods with different mass spectrometric and chromatographic methods enables to obtain a 
fairly comprehensive picture of the varnish composition.

 

 

Viited: 

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